Historical Marker Series

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal

Showing results 1 to 10 of 51
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM43_francis-scott-key-park_Washington-DC.html
A Place With Its Own History. Before 1620 the area of the Francis Scott Key Park was inhabited by members of the Algonquian, Nacostine, Nacotchatank, Piscatoway and Patawomeke tribes. In 1634 it became part of the English Colony of Maryland. Beginnin…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM6F_at-all-hours_Washington-DC.html
"It shall be their duty, at all hours, by night as well as by day, to pass all boats and floats presenting themselves at their locks." —Charles Mercer, President, C&O Canal Company. Every time his boat passed through a lock, a boat captain put his …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM6N_creating-a-national-park_Washington-DC.html
"It is a refuge, a place of retreat, a long stretch of quiet and peace at the Capital's back door . . ." —William O. Douglas Look around you. The park you stand in exists because people cared. In January 1954, Justice William O. Douglas of the Supr…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMFH_an-ideal-crossing_Poolesville-MD.html
The Potomac River is calm and narrow here, making it an ideal location for a ferry crossing. In 1791 Edwards Ferry began to operate here, connecting Maryland farmers to the Goose Creek Canal in Virginia and to the Leesburg markets. The ferry closed in 1836 …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMMH_ferry-hill-place_Sharpsburg-MD.html
John Blackford, in 1810, built the Ferry Hill Plantation House standing before you. Blackford owned 25 slaves and managed the farm by himself. The slaves and hired laborers worked with minimum direction. Two slaves, Ned and Jupe, ran the river ferry for whi…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMPO_lock-keepers-house_Washington-DC.html
Formerly the eastern terminal of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Erected about 1835. The canal passed along the present line of B Street in front of this house emptying into Tiber Creek and the Potomac River.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMQ7_the-canal-connection_Washington-DC.html
President George Washington commissioned Pierre L'Enfant to design the Capital City in 1790. The L'Enfant Plan included a system of canals to transport heavy goods at a time when roads and streets were few and muddy. The Washington City Canal (green) was op…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2B2_berlin_Brunswick-MD.html
First called Berlin, later Barry, and finally named Brunswick in 1890, the town's fortunes fluctuated with the times. The canal was built here in 1834 and a large gristmill, powered by canal water, was built on the canal across from the towpath. During the …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2B3_water-power_Brunswick-MD.html
Canal water was an important ingredient in the production of "C.F. Wenner's Choice Family Flour." Brunswick businessman Charles F. Wenner drew surplus water from the canal near Lock 30 to power the wheels and turbines of his flour mill. Wenner was one of se…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2R3_lift-lock-33_Knoxville-MD.html
Here, the forces of nature created a natural corridor for commerce. The Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers carved a notch in the mountains, providing passage west. Communities grew up on both sides of the river and later a turnpike, railroad, and canal came thro…
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