Historical Marker Series

Braddock's Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock

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www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1FZ_braddock-park_Farmington-PA.html
Gen. Edward Braddock was buried here in 1755, after his disastrous defeat and death. The site of his original grave, the new grave to which his remains were moved in 1804, and a trace of the Braddock Road may be seen here.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1LW_first-roads-to-the-west_Farmington-PA.html
Before the Europeans, only Indian trails led through virgin forests that once stretched beyond the horizon. About 1750 Nemacolin, a Delaware Indian, blazed a trail past here for the Ohio Company. Four years later, Virginia militia under Lt. Col. George Wash…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1N5_road-to-disaster_Farmington-PA.html
On June 25, 1755, the largest army assembled in North America up to that time passed this spot. British Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock led the first 1,400 soldiers of his 2,400-man army along a 12-foot-wide road. Lt. Col. Thomas Dunbar lagged behind with 1,000 m…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1NG_a-secret-grave_Farmington-PA.html
Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock—commander-in-chief of British forces in North America—traveled over the road trace below on June 25, 1755. Marching north with his 2,400-man army, the 60-year-old Braddock was under orders to capture Fort Duquesne and f…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1OF_braddocks-original-grave-site_Farmington-PA.html
This tablet marks the spot where Major-General Edward Braddock was buried, July 14th, 1755. His remains were removed in 1804 to the site of the present monument.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1PZ_braddock-road_Markleysburg-PA.html
General Braddock's eighth camp, June 25, 1755, on the march to Fort Duquesne, was about half a mile S.W. Chestnut Ridge, seen on the horizon to the west, was the last mt. range to be crossed. Axemen widened an Indian path for passage of supply wagons and a…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1QL_great-crossings_Addison-PA.html
About one half mile above this point is the "Great Crossings" of the Youghiogheny River, where George Washington crossed November 18th, 1753, when sent as envoy by Gov. Dinwiddie of Virginia to the French Commandant at Fort Le Boeuf. Washington, on his m…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1RS_bear-camp_Grantsville-MD.html
General Braddock's 6th camp on the march to Fort Duquesne Saturday and Sunday June 20th and 21st, 1755. Washington was forced to remain behind with a guard on account of "violent fevers" until cured by "Dr. James's Powders (one of the most excellent medicin…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1S3_general-braddocks-5th-camp_Grantsville-MD.html
On the march to Fort Duquesne June 19th, 1755. By Washington's advice, Braddock pushed forward from Little Meadows to this camp with 1200 chosen men and officers leaving the heavy artillery and baggage behind to follow by easy stages under Colonel Dunbar.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1SA_the-little-crossings_Grantsville-MD.html
The "Little Crossings" of the Little Youghiogeny River, now called Castleman's River). So called by George Washington when he crossed on June 19, 1755, with General Edward Braddock on the ill-fated expedition to Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh).
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