Historical Marker Series

Oregon Trail

Page 2 of 20 — Showing results 11 to 20 of 194
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEJ1_old-fort-boise_Parma-ID.html
An important Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post was established in 1834 four miles west of here on the bank of the Snake River. Fur trading declined, but this British post became famous for its hospitality to American travellers on the Oregon Trail. An…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMENU_oregon-trail_Boise-ID.html
Indians, trappers, and emigrants who came this way before 1900 used a more direct route to get between Boise and Glenns Ferry. Their road still can be seen at Bonneville Point 5 miles from here. Following close to a line of hills bordering a broad, roll…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMER3_emigrant-crossing_Caldwell-ID.html
After reaching Boise River, emigrant wagons had to travel 30 miles to find a good crossing about 1/4 mile north of here. They had to avoid a wide zone of shifting channels, so they descended Canyon Hill where the route is still visible. In 1853, Maria B…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMER5_the-ward-massacre_Caldwell-ID.html
Only 2 young boys survived the Indian attack on Alexander Ward's 20 member party, Oregon bound on August 20, 1854. Military retaliation for the slaughter so enraged the Indians that Hudson's Bay Co. posts Fort Boise and Fort Hall had to be abandoned, and…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEYW_the-oregon-trail_Boise-ID.html
The Oregon Trail is still clearly visible coming off the rimrock across the river. Here the west bound emigrants after 1840 came gratefully down into this green valley. The first cart passed here with Spalding and Whitman, pioneer missionaries, in 1836. …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEYX_beaver-dicks-ferry_Boise-ID.html
In 1863 and 1864, overland packers hauling supplies from Salt Lake City to Idaho City crossed here and took a direct route northward to More's Creek. They cut a steep grade from the Oregon Trail down to Beaver Dick's Ferry, which served a crossing only a…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMFCE_snake-river_Fruitland-ID.html
The valley of the Snake, historic passage from the Midwest to the Northwest, has been a primary route for travel since the days of Indians and fur traders. The Oregon Trail forded the river at Old Fort Boise, the Hudson's Bay Company 12 miles upstream. …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMFD8_brownlee-ferry_Cambridge-ID.html
Guiding Oregon Trail emigrants and a party of prospectors who had discovered gold in Boise Basin, Tim Goodale opened a new miners' trail through here in August 1862. A gold rush followed that fall, and John Brownlee operated a ferry here from 1862 to 186…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HML2E_rock-creek-station_Hansen-ID.html
An 1864 overland stage station at Rock Creek, 5 miles south and a mile west of here, offered a desert oasis for 40 years before irrigated farming transformed this area. James Bascom's 1865 store and Herman Stricker's 1900 mansion have been preserved as t…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HML4C_salmon-falls_Hagerman-ID.html
In 1812, Joseph Miller found 100 lodges of Indians spearing thousands of salmon each afternoon at a cascade below here. Each summer they dried a year's supply. After 1842, they also traded salmon to Oregon Trail emigrants. John C. Fremont marveled at Sal…
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