Historical Marker Series

Wabash & Erie Canal

Showing results 1 to 10 of 37
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM36_delphi_Delphi-IN.html
Named and platted in 1828 by Gen. Samuel Milroy, on 100 acres donated by Wm. Wilson for the seat of Carroll Co., named for Charles Carroll, last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. Henry Robinson was the first settler. Transportation provid…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMZM_gronauer-lock-no-2_New-Haven-IN.html
Wabash and Erie Canal lock was discovered here June 1991 during excavation for highway construction. It was built 1838-1840 by Henry Lotz and named for lock keeper Joseph Gronauer. The rare, well-preserved timber-frame design lock measured 115 by 40 feet; l…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1KN_attica-covington-canal-skirmish_Attica-IN.html
In fall 1846, residents of Covington and Attica skirmished at Lock 35 over lack of water to Covington. Heavy rains eventually resolved the problem. Competition among canal towns over water control was often intense. First boat reached Attica 1846 via Wabash…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1UW_wabash-erie-canal_Montezuma-IN.html
The Wabash & Erie was the longest canal built in North America, running from Toledo to Evansville. Montezuma was the main port of Parke County. This portion was abandoned about 1865.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4NS_wabash-and-erie-canal_Delphi-IN.html
Constructed 1832-1853, canal was nation's longest, connecting Lake Erie at Toledo with Ohio River at Evansville. Key portion in Carroll County included Deer Creek Lake Dam, constructed 1838-1840 (1 mile west). Various canal structures are still in evidence.
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4NY_burks-lock_Huntington-IN.html
The canal boat "Indiana" docked here on the evening of July 3, 1835, opening the Wabash and Erie canal to traffic from Fort Wayne to Huntington. This was the first section of the canal opened in Indiana. John Burk, for whom the lock was named, was a member …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4NZ_rock-house_Huntington-IN.html
The first permanent hotel of Huntington was built of stone on this site by General John Tipton in 1835. Standing on the bank of the Wabash and Erie Canal, it was a commercial, political and social center. From 1862 to 1872 it housed one of the first public …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMB39_the-wabash-erie-canal_Fort-Wayne-IN.html
Anchoring the southern edge of the Headwaters Park "Thumb" until circa 1874, the Wabash & Erie Canal's importance to transportation to the western part of the United States and to the growth of Fort Wayne was substantial. Headwaters Park is on the "Summit" …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMCS8_two-canals_Defiance-OH.html
This marker is on the trunk line of both the Miami & Erie Canal and the Wabash & Erie Canal. The Miami & Erie Canal, built by Ohio, was begun on July 21, 1825 and completed in 1845. It connected the Ohio River at Cincinnati with Lake Erie at Toledo. By the …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMCS9_canal-terminus-manhattan_Toledo-OH.html
[Marker Front]:Canal TerminusThe original northernmost lock in a canal system which linked Lake Erie with the Ohio River was located near the foot of LaSalle Street. Indiana's Wabash & Erie Canal (1843 - 1874) joined Ohio's Miami & Erie Canal (1845 - 1913) …
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