Historical Marker Series

Washington and Old Dominion Railroad

Showing results 1 to 10 of 53
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMB6_mosbys-herndon-station-raid_Herndon-VA.html
On St. Patrick's Day, March 17, 1863, Confederate Capt. John S. Mosby and 40 Partisan Rangers attacked the picket post of the 1st Vermont Cavalry guarding this station on the Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad. The detachment commander Lt. Alexander…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMBE_herndon-station_Herndon-VA.html
Herndon grew up around this railroad station. The town received its name in 1858 when the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad (later the W&OD) arrived and a post office was established in the newly built station. Herndon quickly became the commercia…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMBM_tracks-into-history_Herndon-VA.html
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the Shenandoa…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMO3_clarkes-gap_Leesburg-VA.html
At 582 feet, Clarkes Gap, up the hill to your left, was the highest point on the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad. The stone bridge dates from the 1870s, when the tracks were completed to Clarkes Gap. The station stood on the site where you are now locate…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMPP_vienna-station_Vienna-VA.html
Vienna Station, shown in the center of the photograph below in 1864, has stood here since the arrival of the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railway (later the Washington & Old Dominion Railway) in 1859. The farm community of Ayr Hill consisted of house…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMPT_tracks-into-history_Vienna-VA.html
The railroad that became the Washington & Old Dominion was born in Alexandria in response to the competition in shipping posed by the port in Baltimore, which was served by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The B&O was diverting farm produce from the Shenandoa…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMPU_electric-trains-on-the-w-od_Vienna-VA.html
Electrification arrived in 1912, after the Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad and the Southern Railway's Bluemont Branch were consolidated into the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. The new owners brought modern interurban trolley cars. Wire strung above …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMQ3_the-great-falls-line_Leesburg-VA.html
The Bluemont Branch of the Washington & Old Dominion was not the railroad's only line. The Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad arose in 1906 from the vision of two prominent men. Sen. Stephen B. Elkins of West Virginia had prospered through coal, lumber, an…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMQ4_electric-trains-on-the-w-od_Leesburg-VA.html
Electrification arrived in 1912, after the Great Falls & Old Dominion Railroad and the Southern Railway's Bluemont Branch were consolidated into the Washington & Old Dominion Railway. The new owners brought modern interurban trolley cars. Wire strung above …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMQ5_the-leesburg-lime-company_Leesburg-VA.html
The arrival of the railroad in the 1860s spawned new businesses. One such enterprise was the Leesburg Lime Company, which operated at the site where you are now located. In 1868 a local newspaper announced: New Lime Kiln— Messrs. Orr & Manning hav…
PAGE 1 OF 6