Historical Marker Series

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway

Showing results 1 to 10 of 18
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I4M_william-still-center-families-divided-united_Denton-MD.html
William Still's mother Sidney and several of his siblings lived in a cottage on the plantation where they were enslaved. Sidney escaped with her children to join her husband in New Jersey, but she was soon recaptured and returned to Maryland. Leaving her tw…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I4O_sailing-away-to-freedom-glipin-point_Preston-MD.html
Glipin's Point was one of the busiest wharves along the Choptank River in Caroline County where steamboats and sailing vessels transported people, timber, agricultural products, and seafood. It sat just upriver from Dr. Anthony C. Thompson's plantation wher…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I4S_webb-cabin-living-free_Preston-MD.html
Common in the mid-19th century, this cabin is a rare survivor today. James H. and Mary Ann Webb built this one-room house in the 1850s, using materials found in the surrounding landscape. Hand-hewn log walls rest on a foundation of ballast stones from ships…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I4T_leverton-house-finding-safe-haven_Preston-MD.html
Refugees from slavery came here for temporary sanctuary. Under the cover of darkness, they crept across these fields toward the home of Quaker Jacob and Hannah Leverton. The house, a rare, documented Underground Railroad station, still stands at the end of…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I4V_linchester-mill-living-dangerously_Preston-MD.html
Daily life at and around Linchester Mill provided fertile yet dangerous ground for those seeking freedom. The mill, a general store, post office and homes at this site brought whites and blacks, free and enslaved, into regular contact. Freedom and slavery…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I57_choptank-river-heritage-center-steal-away-by-river_Denton-MD.html
The Choptank River was as entwined with the history of slavery and freedom on the Eastern Shore as any plantation. Slaves arrived by boat for auction and left the dock in the hands of a new owner. At wharves like this, black watermen played an important rol…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I58_moses-and-the-hounds_Denton-MD.html
Growing up as a slave near Easton, MD, Moses Viney often heard, "The wild geese come from Canada, where all are free." When he was 23 years old, Moses learned he might be sold to a new owner in the Deep South. To avoid this fate, he and two friend…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I59_caroline-courthouse-in-the-shadow-of-justice_Denton-MD.html
Many facets of 19th century rural life focused on a county's courthouse. Elected officials, lawyers, merchants, and ordinary citizens all had reasons to gather at the Caroline County Courthouse Square. For the enslaved and abolitionists, the square possesse…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I5L_greensboro-threatened-by-ideas_Greensboro-MD.html
More than cargo flowed through commercial towns like Greensboro. Abolitionist ideas and freedom seekers on the move created tension within a society dependent on slavery. Site of the northern-most bridge over the Choptank River, Greensboro served as a link…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1I5M_adkins-arboretum-slavery-arboretum_Ridgely-MD.html
The forests and waterways of the Eastern Shore, traditional land of the Choptank and Nanticoke Indians, provided the backup for the austere home life, backbreaking labor, and dramatic escapes of enslaved blacks. Hundreds of acres of white oak, black walnut…
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