Historical Marker Series

Mississippi Freedom Trail

Showing results 1 to 10 of 12
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1GTV_the-reverend-george-lee_Belzoni-MS.html
Front The Reverend George Lee (1903-1955), a pioneer in the early Mississippi civil rights movement, was a vice president of the Regional Council of Negro Leadership, a co-founder of the Belzoni NAACP branch, and a powerful public speaker. In the spring of…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1GU5_bryants-grocery_Greenwood-MS.html
Front Fourteen-year-old Emmett Till came to this site to buy candy in August 1955. White shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant accused the black youth of flirting with her, and shortly thereafter, Till was abducted by Bryant's husband and his half brother. Till's tort…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1GU9_black-power-speech_Greenwood-MS.html
Front On June 16, 1966, SNCC chairman Stokely Carmichael, released from jail after defying City of Greenwood orders by putting up tents to house participants of the James Meredith "March Against Fear," made his famous "Black Power" spe…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XQ4_university-of-mississippi-historical_Oxford-MS.html
Front On October 1, 1962, James Meredith broke the rigid segregation in Mississippi's higher education when he became the first African American student at the University of Mississippi. Though federal courts had ordered his admission, Governor Ross Barn…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2257_c-c-bryant_McComb-MS.html
Side 1Elected president of the Pike County branch of the NAACP in 1954, Curtis Conway Bryant (1917-2001) played a major role in early civil rights activism of southwest Mississippi. He campaigned to expand membership in the NAACP, led large voter registrati…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM22BT_jackson-municipal-library-sit-in_Jackson-MS.html
Front On March 27, 1961, nine African American Tougaloo students quietly sat in at the Jackson Municipal Library, which served only white patrons. Pollce ordered them to Carver Library, the "colored" library, and when they refused, arrested them. Large…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM268G_medgar-evers-home_Jackson-MS.html
Front Medgar and Myrlie Evers moved into this home with their children - Darrell and Reena - in 1955 after Medgar became Mississippi's first NAACP Field Secretary. Son Van was born in 1960. Evers was an outspoken activist for voter registration a…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM268H_cofo-central-offices_Jackson-MS.html
Front From this building, COFO (Council of Federated Organizations) coordinated efforts of SNCC, NAACP, CORE, SCLC, and other activist groups from early 1963 through early 1965. Clarksdale's Aaron Henry was COFO president. Bob Moses, program dire…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM26G8_tougaloo-college_Jackson-MS.html
Front The courage of Tougaloo College students, faculty, and staff fueled the Jackson Civil Rights Movement. Inspired by the bravery and resolve of Medgar Evers, students and faculty attempted to integrate Jackson's main public library, restaurants, and …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM26QX_rust-college_Holly-Springs-MS.html
Front In 1960 Rust College students, under the leadership of President E. A. Smith, boycotted the segregated HollyTheater, a protest that in 1962 evolved into a Rust chapter of the NAACP. The chapter offices were installed by Medgar Evers, NAACP field se…
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