Historical Marker Series

Nebraska: Nebraska State Historical Society

Showing results 1 to 10 of 133
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMZQ_windlass-hill-pioneer-homestead_Oshkosh-NE.html
The stones surrounding this marker are the remains of the homestead dwelling of Reverend Dennis B. Clary, a pioneer Methodist Minister, who received final patent for his homestead Mar 22, 1899. Mr. Clary was born September 1st 1822, in Maryland and immigrat…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMZS_ash-hollow_Oshkosh-NE.html
Ash Hollow was famous on the Oregon Trail. A branch of the trail ran northwestward from the Lower California Crossing of the South Platte River a few miles west of Brule, and descended here into the North Platte Valley. The hollow, named for a growth of ash…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMZU_ash-hollow-geology_Big-Springs-NE.html
Ash Hollow is a focal point for understanding the geologic history of the Central Great Plains prior to the onset of the Great Ice Age. It is the type locality of the Ash Hollow Formation, named by Henry Engelmann after a visit in 1858-1859. These sediments…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM26B_buffalo-soldiers-at-fort-robinson_Harrison-NE.html
Black soldiers of the Ninth and Tenth Cavalry regiments (called "buffalo soldiers" by the Plains Indians) garrisoned Fort Robinson for eighteen years and played an important role in northwestern Nebraska's history. Organized in 1866, the regiments first ser…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2EO_fort-robinson_Harrison-NE.html
In March, 1874, the U.S. Government authorized the establishment of a military camp at the Red Cloud Indian Agency on the White River. Home of some 13,000 Indians, many of whom were hostile, the Agency was one of the most troublesome spots on the Plains. Th…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2FO_bordeaux-trading-post_Chadron-NE.html
From about 1846 until 1872, an Indian "trading house" occupied a site near here. Built by James Bordeaux, the trading station was once attacked and set afire by hostile Crow warriors. Fortunately, some friendly Sioux Indians came to the rescue and drove off…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2FP_the-fort-pierre-fort-laramie-trail_Chadron-NE.html
From about 1837 until 1850, more than a quarter million buffalo robes bought from Indians and 27 tons of fur company trade goods were hauled over the 300 mile long Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie Trail that followed the White River through this area. First used by…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4TW_the-death-of-marshal-suverkrubbe_Fort-Calhoun-NE.html
About 3 a.m. on December 5, 1932, Fort Calhoun marshal Albert Suverkrubbe was shot while trying to apprehend two men fleeing Kruse's Red and White Grocery at 106 S. Fourteenth Street. Suverkrubbe died from his wounds nine days later, leaving his wife, Franc…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4TY_fort-atkinson_Fort-Calhoun-NE.html
From 1820 to 1827, the nation's largest and most westerly military post occupied this site, the earlier scene of Lewis and Clark's Council Bluff. In late 1819, troops under Colonel Henry Atkinson established Cantonment Missouri along the river near here. In…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM4UM_cuming-city-cemetery-and-nature-preserve_Blair-NE.html
Traditionally known as the Cuming City Cemetery, this eleven-acre tract of land was set aside in 1976 primarily as a preserve for native vegetation. Never plowed, this prairie looks much like it did to the Indians and to the first white men who settled Nebr…
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