Historical Marker Series

Idaho: Idaho State Historical Society

Showing results 1 to 10 of 106
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2IO_nez-perce-war_White-Bird-ID.html
Near the base of this hill, over 100 cavalrymen and volunteers met disaster in the opening battle of The Nez Perce War. Rushing from Grangeville on the evening of June 16, 1877, Captain David Perry planned to stop the Indians from crossing Salmon River t…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2IV_goodales-cutoff_Carey-ID.html
When emigrants began to take their westbound wagons along an old Indian and trapper's trail past this lava, they had to develop a wild and winding road. At this spot, like many others, they had hardly enough space to get by. At times, they could not avoi…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEIY_lower-boise_Notus-ID.html
Confederate refugees from Missouri started farming in this area in 1863 and 1864, when gold and silver mining camps created a great demand for flour and cattle. Driven out from their Missouri River homes below Kansas City by extremely bitter Civil War bo…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEJ1_old-fort-boise_Parma-ID.html
An important Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post was established in 1834 four miles west of here on the bank of the Snake River. Fur trading declined, but this British post became famous for its hospitality to American travellers on the Oregon Trail. An…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEJ3_marie-dorion_Parma-ID.html
An Iowa Indian who came through here with Wilson Price Hunt's fur trappers in 1811, Marie Dorion spent an incredible winter in this region in 1814. She and her two infant children were sole survivors of a mid-January Bannock Indian clash at John Reid's …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMENU_oregon-trail_Boise-ID.html
Indians, trappers, and emigrants who came this way before 1900 used a more direct route to get between Boise and Glenns Ferry. Their road still can be seen at Bonneville Point 5 miles from here. Following close to a line of hills bordering a broad, roll…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMER3_emigrant-crossing_Caldwell-ID.html
After reaching Boise River, emigrant wagons had to travel 30 miles to find a good crossing about 1/4 mile north of here. They had to avoid a wide zone of shifting channels, so they descended Canyon Hill where the route is still visible. In 1853, Maria B…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMER5_the-ward-massacre_Caldwell-ID.html
Only 2 young boys survived the Indian attack on Alexander Ward's 20 member party, Oregon bound on August 20, 1854. Military retaliation for the slaughter so enraged the Indians that Hudson's Bay Co. posts Fort Boise and Fort Hall had to be abandoned, and…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEXN_diversion-dam_Boise-ID.html
Diversion Dam was completed in 1909 to lift water into an already constructed New York canal system, greatly expanding its irrigated farmlands. After a quarter century of failure to dig a large canal above Diversion Dam, United States Reclamation Service…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMEXV_mores-creek_Boise-ID.html
More's Creek is named for J. Marion More, leader of the party of miners who founded Idaho City, October 7, 1862. Like most of Idaho's early miners, he came originally from the South. Unlike most of them, he struck it rich. During the Idaho gold rush, he…
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