Historical Marker Series

El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail

Page 2 of 4 — Showing results 11 to 20 of 35
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMKKG_texas-louisiana-boundary_Hemphill-TX.html
Old San Antonio RoadMarked by theDaughters of the American Revolutionand the State of TexasA.D. 1918
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMKM4_halfway-inn_Chireno-TX.html
This two-story log dwelling was built on the El Camino Real about 1840 by Samuel Flournoy for his wife Minerva (Wadington) and their family who moved to Texas from Mississippi. They settled in the Chireno area, where they purchased 300 acres. An active memb…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMKQW_the-mission-period_San-Antonio-TX.html
This region was inhabited by native peoples from early times. Among them were the Payayas, who lived along a river they called Yanaguana. On June 13, 1691, Franciscan Father Dami?n Massanet arrived and christened the river San Antonio de Padua in honor of S…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMMP9_the-mission-road-el-camino-de-las-misiones_San-Antonio-TX.html
This road linked the mission of San Antonio with each other and with the rest of Texas and Mexico. The Mission Road carried information, supplies and trade goods, and warnings of attack or danger. Some of the travel routes used by residents of the missions …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMMPK_mission-san-jos-la-misi-n-de-san-jos_San-Antonio-TX.html
"It is truthfully the best of the Americas, and not in the like of the others; nor in all the frontier does the King have an outpost better constructed and easier to defend..."Fr. Juan Agust?n de Morfi, 1777-78 Mission San Jos? and its surrounding fields…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMO7J_presidio-de-nuestra-se-ora-de-loreto-de-la-bah_Goliad-TX.html
One of the most historic Spanish forts in Texas. Popularly called Presidio la Bah?a, it was founded on Esp?ritu Santo (present Lavaca) Bay in 1722. Twice moved, it was re-established here in 1749 to protect Espiritu Santo Mission (1/4 mi. NW). In the chape…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMS3B_smithville_Smithville-TX.html
In 1691 missionaries on the expedition of Don Domingo Teran De Los Rios sighted a lagoon which the Indians called Nenocadda. The lagoon, known today as Shipp's Lake, is on the southern edge of present Smithville. Frederick W. Grasmeyer operated a ferry here…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMTCP_early-roads-to-san-felipe_Sealy-TX.html
During the mid-1820's, When Stephen F. Austin was founding this town, the only roads in the area were wagon ruts or beaten trails marked by notched trees. Within a decade, however, the village of San Felipe, one of the first Anglo settlements in Texas, had …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM106Q_wonder-cave_San-Marcos-TX.html
In Balcones Fault, created by prehistoric earth shift. Said to have been campsite of Indians and Spaniards, especially priests who planted anaqua trees in area. By legend, robber gangs in 1820s cached Camino Real booty here. Discovered 1893 for Anglo-Tex…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM12DL_atascosa-county_Jourdanton-TX.html
As early as 1722 El Camino Real (The King's Highway) from the Rio Grande to San Antonio was well established in this area. The Spanish word "Atascosa," denoting boggy ground that hindered travel, gave region its name. The county was created in 1856 from lan…
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