Historical Marker Series

Rosenwald Schools

Showing results 1 to 10 of 75
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2QX_powell-point-school_Beasley-TX.html
William E. Kendall, an Anglo lawyer from Richmond, Texas, subdivided his plantation here into 100-acre farm tracts in 1869. He sold the land exclusively to Freedmen and by the 1880s a distinctly African American community named Kendleton had developed here.…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM5QL_marley-neck-school_Glen-Burnie-MD.html
This historic school is a significant example of a Rosenwald School design and represents a landmark era in black education in the period before federal support of local education. The school was built in 1927 with funds raised by the local African-American…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8PR_noble-hill-rosenwald-school_Cartersville-GA.html
Noble Hill Rosenwald School, now known as Noble Hill-Wheeler Memorial Center, built in 1923 as the first standard school for Black children in Bartow County School System. The school closed in 1955 when all schools for Black Children in Bartow County wereco…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8PZ_the-hiram-rosenwald-school_Hiram-GA.html
In 1912 Julius Rosenwald, President of Sears, Roebuck and Company, established the Rosenwald Fund to assist in community school construction of public schools forAfrican-American students in the South. The Julius Rosenwald Fund assisted local communities wh…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8SK_freetown_Pasadena-MD.html
Established in the mid 19th century on land owned by Capt. James Spencer, who served in the Union Army during the Civil War, Freetown illustrates the principles of self-sufficiency and cooperation typical of African American communities. The first public sc…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMDYJ_rosenwald-school-at-cartersville_Cartersville-VA.html
Julius Rosenwald, a former president of Sears, Roebuck & Co., continued the efforts made by numerous philanthropists to bring education to African Americans in the South. During the early 1900s, funding for schools was scarce; the South had half as much per…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMET8_radcliff-school_Columbus-GA.html
In the fall of 1914 Radcliff School was organized in Allen Temple A.M.E. Church. At that time it was known as Wynnton Hill School. J. L. Bond was principal and the first head teacher was Mrs. S. A. Cody. When the building burned, the school was relocated to…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMF56_laurens-county-training-school_Gray-Court-SC.html
[Front]:The Laurens County Training School, located here 1924-1954, had its origins in Gray Court School, a one-room school founded ca. 1890 on the grounds of Pleasant View Baptist Church. The training school, opened in 1924 in a building constructed with a…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMF67_nansemond-county-training-school_Suffolk-VA.html
Two miles south stood the Nansemond County training School, he first high school in the county for African American students. It was constructed in 1924 with $5,000 contributed by African American families, $11,500 in public money, and $1,500 from the Rosen…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMF6E_julius-rosenwald-high-school_Reedville-VA.html
Originally known as Northumberland County Training School, this institution opened in 1917, under principal John M. Ellison. Local African Americans raised more than $7,000 to build the school and received additional funding from the Rosenwald Fund. Julius …
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