Historical Marker Series

Mississippi Blues Trail

Showing results 1 to 10 of 97
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMICU_columbus-mississippi-blues_Columbus-MS.html
The Black Prairies of eastern Mississippi have produced a number of notable blues musicians, including Howlin' Wolf, Bukka White, and Big Joe Williams. Activity in Columbus, the largest city in the region, centered around areas such as this block of 4th Str…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMIGH_big-joe-williams_Crawford-MS.html
Side ABig Joe Williams (c. 1903-1982) epitomized the life and times of the rambunctious, roving bluesman, traveling from coast to coast and around the world playing rugged, rhythmic blues on his nine-string guitar at juke joints, house parties, and concerts…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMJR2_shake-rag_Tupelo-MS.html
Marker Front:Shake Rag, located east of the old M & O (later GM & O) railway tracks and extending northward from Main Street, was one of several historic African American communities in Tupelo. By the 1920s blues and jazz flowed freely from performers at Sh…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMJW5_elvis-presley-and-the-blues_Tupelo-MS.html
Marker Front:Elvis Presley revolutionized popular music by blending the blues he first heard as a youth in Tupelo with country, pop, and gospel.Many of the first songs Elvis recorded for the Sun label in Memphis were covers of earlier blues recordings by Af…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMLPZ_the-blues-trail-from-mississippi-to-memphis_Memphis-TN.html
The bright lights of Beale Street and the promise of musical stardom have lured blues musicians from nearby Mississippi since the early 1900s. Early Memphis blues luminaries who migrated from Mississippi include Gus Cannon, Furry Lewis, Jim Jackson and Memp…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMNRK_rabbit-foot-minstrels_Port-Gibson-MS.html
[front:] Rabbit Foot Minstrels. During the first half of the 20th century, the African American Rabbit Foot Minstrels entertainers played a major role in spreading the blues via tours across the South. Founded in 1900, the "Foots" were headquartered in Port…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMW9R_the-blues-trail_Chicago-IL.html
[Side A:]The "Great Migration" from the South to "the Promised Land" of Chicago brought more African Americans here from Mississippi than any other state, especially during and after World War II. With the migrants came the Delta blues that was the foundati…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMXIX_edwards-hotel_Jackson-MS.html
Constructed in 1923 and renamed the King Edward Hotel in 1954, the Edwards Hotel was the site of temporary studios set up by OKeh Records in 1930 and the American Record Corporation in 1935 to record blues artists Bo Carter, Robert Wilkins, Joe McCoy, Isaia…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMXIY_ace-records_Jackson-MS.html
Ace Records, founded in 1955 by Johnny Vincent (1925-2000), was the most successful Mississippi-based label of the 1950s and 1960s. Ace's extensive catalog of blues, R&B, pop, rock, and soul included records by Mississippi blues artists Arthur Crudup, Sam M…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMXUX_j-b-lenior_Monticello-MS.html
Monticello area native J. B. Lenoir (1929-1967) was best known during his lifetime for his 1955 hit "Mama, Talk to Your Daughter," but he also played an important role in blues history because of his political engagement. In the 1960s Lenoir recorded a body…
PAGE 1 OF 10