Historical Marker Series

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro

Showing results 1 to 10 of 73
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM3X5_oates-route_Anthony-NM.html
Juan de Oñate, first governor of New Mexico, passed near here with his colonizing expedition in May, 1598. Traveling north, he designated official campsites (called parajes) on the Camino Real, used by expeditions that followed. In Oñate's caravan were 12…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM3X9_brazito-battlefield_Anthony-NM.html
One of the few battles of the Mexican War to be fought in New Mexico occured near here on Christmas Day, 1846. U.S. troops under Colonel Alexander W. Doniphan defeated a Mexican army commanded by General Antonio Ponce de Le?n. Two days later, Doniphan enter…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM3XA_butterfield-trail-espejos-expedition_Anthony-NM.html
Stagecoaches of the Butterfield Overland Mail Co. began carrying passengers and mail from St. Louis to San Francisco, across southern New Mexico, in 1858. The 2,795-mile journey took 21-22 days. In 1861 the service was re-routed through Salt Lake City. Here…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM498_la-mesilla_Las-Cruces-NM.html
After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which concluded the Mexican War in 1848, the Mexican government commissioned Cura Ram?n Ortiz to settle Mesilla. He brought families from New Mexico and from Paso del Norte (modern Ci?dad Ju?rez) to populate the Mesill…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMG4K_peralta_Peralta-NM.html
One of the last skirmishes of the Civil War in New Mexico took place here on April 15, 1862. The Sibley Brigade, retreating to Texas, camped at the hacienda of Governor Henry Connelly, a few miles from Peralta.Here the Confederates were routed by Union forc…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMGFH_hatch_Hatch-NM.html
Originally established as Santa Barbara in 1851, Apache raids drove the settlers away until 1853 when nearby Fort Thorn was established. Abandoned again in 1860 after the fort closed, it was reoccupied in 1875 and re-named for General Edward Hatch, then Com…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMLW6_la-angostura_Algodones-NM.html
Near here the Rio Grande Valley closes into a narrow pass (angostura). Control of this pass was critical to the safety of the trade along the Camino Real, so this area has been the focus of fortifications since the early 17th century. The 18th century settl…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMLWI_santuario-de-chimay_Chimayo-NM.html
In 1816, Bernardo Abeyta and the other residents of El Potrero, then a separate community, finished this massive adobe chapel honoring Nuestro Se?or de Esqu?pulas. It is noted for its 6-foot crucifix and its tradition of healing the sick. The Santuario rema…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMLWK_chimayo_Chimayo-NM.html
Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 years. …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMLWQ_vasquez-de-coronados-route_Zia-Pueblo-NM.html
In 1541 an expedition from the army of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, New Mexico's first explorer, marched south 80 leagues to investigate the pueblos along the lower Rio Grande. The group reached that part of the infamous Jornada del Muerto, now covered by…
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