Historical Marker Series

Sons of Utah Pioneers

Showing results 1 to 10 of 52
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM7D_the-historic-hurricane-canal_Washington-UT.html
When first conceived, the Hurricane Canal seemed like an impossible dream. Beginning at a point seven miles up the Virgin River, water had to travel through flumes, tunnels, and over deep ravines. The canal had to hang on steep, unstable cliffs and be tunne…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM7E_birth-of-hurricane_Hurricane-UT.html
1893-1904This monument is near the spot where a celebration took place on August 6, 1904. After nearly eleven years of arduous work on the canal, water was ready for diversion onto the land. "Five or six wagon loads of people came from the little towns …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8C_legacy-of-the-black-pioneer_Salt-Lake-City-UT.html
In 1824-26 the first black man came into Utah Territory. He was a trapper for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. His name was James Beckworth. In succeeding years many black people would follow to contribute to the development of Utah, socially and economicall…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8G_gardeners-club-hall_St-George-UT.html
Built just five years after St. George was settled, the Gardeners' Club Hall is considered to be the oldest public building standing in the city. This small, unassuming adobe building predates the courthouse, the Tabernacle and the Temple by several years. …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8H_st-george-temple_St-George-UT.html
When the Mormon pioneers arrived in Utah, they had left behind 2 temples—one in Kirkland, Ohio, and one in Nauvoo, Illinois. Work began on a temple in Salt Lake City in 1853, but was delayed for various reasons. Desirous of having a temple built in th…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8I_st-george-tabernacle_St-George-UT.html
Less than a year after St. George was settled, residents were directed by Brigham Young to "build a building as soon as possible which would be commodious, substantial and well furnished with a seating capacity of 2,000." The building, he said, should be a …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8K_the-woodward-school_St-George-UT.html
When the first settlers arrived in St. George late in 1861, school was held in a wagon box, a tent, a willow shack, or whatever shelter could be improvised. By 1864, the first of four ward houses was completed. It was not until nearly the end of the 1800s t…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8N_pioneer-courthouse_St-George-UT.html
The seat of county government was originally established at Fort Harmony from 1856 until 1859. It was then moved to the city of Washington until 1863 when St. George became the County Seat. By 1866, work had begun on the Washington County Courthouse, a larg…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8O_dixie-academy_St-George-UT.html
Across the street west, and 2 blocks south of here, stands the building originally known as the St. George Academy. After the turn of the century Southern Utah citizens realized a great need for higher education in this isolated corner of the state. The LDS…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8P_st-george-social-hall-opera-house_St-George-UT.html
At a time of colonization, colonizors of the Dixie Cotton Mission were struggling to survive, their leaders planned a higher priority on culture. The Mormon Prophet, Joseph Smith, taught that "man is that he might have joy." His successor Brigham Young inte…
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