Historical Marker Series

Trail of Tears

Showing results 1 to 10 of 95
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1TJ_trail-of-tears_Spencer-TN.html
On October 20, 1837, B. B. Cannon with a group of 365 treaty party Cherokees camped near here on their way to the Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. Rainey's Turnpike crossed here at the old John Fleming farm and in 1838 was one route used for the fo…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM24Q_smiths-crossroads_Dayton-TN.html
Named for pioneer settler William Smith, a New England teacher and merchant, who settled here in 1820, it was the junction of the Kiuka War Trace (later Black Fox Trail) to the Cumberland and the main north-south Indian trail to the Great Lakes. Here in 183…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM6H1_trail-of-tears_Calhoun-GA.html
The New Echota Treaty of 1835 relinquished Cherokee Indian claims to lands east of the Mississippi River. The majority of the Cherokee people considered the treaty fraudulent and refused to leave their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, and Tenn…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM7GB_cherokee-nation_Adairsville-GA.html
During the early 1800's, northern Georgia was heart of the sovereign, independent Cherokee Indian Nation. By this time Cherokee were the most progressive Indian tribe in North America. In 1821, they became the first American Indians with a written form of t…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM86S_john-ross-home_Rossville-GA.html
This comfortable two-story log house was the home of Cherokee Chief John Ross from boyhood until he went west over the "Trail of Tears," losing his Indian wife enroute. Although only one-eighth Indian himself, Ross was the elected "Principal Chief" of the C…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM8C0_fort-cumming_LaFayette-GA.html
Here stood a Cherokee Indian stockade with blockhouse on hill, built by U.S. Government in 1836. Capt. Samuel Fariss and a company of Georgia volunteers guarded Cherokee Indians here before their removal to the west. This fort was presumably named for…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM9QB_chieftains_Rome-GA.html
At this house's core is the 1790s log home of Major Ridge (c.1771-1839), a leader in the Cherokee Nation. His 223-acre plantation supported numerous outbuildings, orchards and slaves while the family served as ferryboat operators and merchants. It was here …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMBTR_trail-of-tears_Bridgeport-AL.html
In May 1838 soldiers, under the command of U.S. Army General Winfield Scott, began rounding up Cherokee Indians in this area who had refused to move to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. About 16,000 Cherokees were placed in stockades in Tennessee and Al…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMC7A_john-howard-payne_Chatsworth-GA.html
Author of "Home,Sweet Home," suspected as a spy of the Cherokee Indians was imprisoned here in 1835, but released. Erected by Old Guard of Atlanta Oct. 6, 1922;Jos. A. McCord; Commandant
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMC7D_chief-vann-house_Chatsworth-GA.html
Built of locally made brick in 1804, this house, the finest in the Cherokee Nation, was the home a Town Chief, James Vann, son of a Scotch trader, Clement Vann, and his wife, a Cherokee chieftain's daughter. Around his home were several of his business vent…
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