Historical Marker Series

Tennessee: Tennessee Civil War Trails

Showing results 1 to 10 of 227
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMF9M_death-of-gen-john-hunt-morgan_Greeneville-TN.html
On September 3-4, 1864, Lt.Col. William H. Ingerton led the 13th Tennessee Cavalry (USA) to Greeneville's outskirts, where he learned that Gen.John Hunt Morgan was at the Dickson-Williams Mansion. He told his company commanders, Capts. C.C. Wilcox and S.E. …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMFOI_the-dickson-williams-mansion_Greeneville-TN.html
Dr. Alexander Williams. Catharine Williams, a famous Greeneville hostess, counted Presidents Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson among her guests. She and her husband also entertained Davy Crockett, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, South Carolina …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMJ3H_delaying-forrest_Columbia-TN.html
(Preface): In September 1864, after Union Gen. William T. Sherman defeated Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood at Atlanta, Hood led the Army of Tennessee northwest against Sherman's supply lines. Rather than contest Sherman's "March to the Sea," Hood moved nort…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMNTX_longstreets-headquarters_Russellville-TN.html
In the winter of 1863-1864, after abandoning the siege of Knoxville, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet was given command of the Confederate forces in Upper East Tennessee. He chose Russellville, a small town on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad rough…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMNU1_bethesda-presbyterian-church_Morristown-TN.html
Bethesda Presbyterian Church, completed 1835, is a powerful reminder of the effect of the Civil War on the Tennessee home front. As the war clouds gathered, conflicting sympathies divided the congregation, and the church closed its doors. After the Battle o…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMNWK_lincoln-and-cumberland-gap_Harrogate-TN.html
Cumberland Gap became the principal passage between the eastern and western theaters of operation in the Upper South during the war. Whichever side held the high ground here held the Gap. In 1861, Confederate Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer's men occupied Cumb…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMOU8_johnstons-last-bivouac_Shiloh-TN.html
(Preface):After the February 1862 Union victories at Forts Henry and Donelson, Gen. Don Carlos Buell's army occupied Nashville while Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's army penetrated to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. Buell and Grant planned to attack the r…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMOWV_battle-of-collierville_Collierville-TN.html
Collierville's location on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad made it strategically important throughout the Civil War. Frequently occupied by Union forces, the town found itself in the gun sights of Confederate cavalrymen intent on severing Federal lines …
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMOWX_chalmerss-collierville-raid_Collierville-TN.html
Early in November 1863, Union Gen. William T. Sherman was moving east to relieve the Union army at Chattanooga. Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston ordered Gen. James R. Chalmers to "harass [Sherman's] rear and break the railroad behind him." Chalmers decid…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HMOX1_battle-of-moscow_Moscow-TN.html
By late in 1863, the Union army occupying West Tennessee strongly defended the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, which ran eastward from Memphis through Moscow. Federal infantry, including the U.S. Colored Troops of the 2nd West Tennessee Infantry, manned a …
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