Historical Marker Series

Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Civil War Trails

Page 4 of 5 — Showing results 31 to 40 of 46
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1VV4_lees-headquarters-at-gettysburg-historical_Gettysburg-PA.html
"Three more acres or less on which are erected a one and a half story stone dwelling house and frame stable ... directed and sold and struck off the same unto Thaddeus Stevens, trustee of Mary Thompson, for the sum of sixteen dollars—Deed dated Jan. 2…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1VVH_lees-headquarters-at-gettysburg-historical_Gettysburg-PA.html
"This is without a doubt the most important preservation effort we've yet undertaken." —Jim Lighthizer, President, Civil War Trust In the decades after the battle, the Thompson House became a popular attraction among visitors interested in Confede…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1VYY_lees-headquarters-at-gettysburg-historical_Gettysburg-PA.html
"This house was within the Rebel lines. Occupying an elevated position from which the Federal lines could be seen with a field glass, and being at a safe distance from our guns, it was selected by General Lee and his staff as his headquarters. Here he lodge…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1WEZ_william-c-goodridge-historical_York-PA.html
Born into slavery in 1805, William C. Goodridge was sent to York at age six to apprentice as a tanner. At age 16, Goodridge was given his freedom, left York and was trained as a barber. He returned to York in the 1820s. After opening a barber shop on Centre…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XIW_the-ladies-of-harrisburg-during-the-civil-war-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
From virtually the first shots of the Civil War, the women of Harrisburg worked in a variety of behind-the-scenes roles that proved essential to the Union victory. When Camp Curtin opened on April 18, 1861, the ladies of Harrisburg were already at work sewi…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XJ0_thomas-morris-chester-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
Thomas Morris Chester was born at the corner of Third and Market Streets in Harrisburg in 1834. One of Harrisburg's most famous nineteenth century African-Americans, he was particularly known for his leadership in education, journalism, military recruitment…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XJT_threatened-invasion-of-harrisburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
General Robert E. Lee decided to take the war into the North in June 1863, allowing Southern farmers an uninterrupted growing season, and perhaps convincing European powers to aid the Confederacy. As the rebels invaded Pennsylvania, Harrisburg made a tempti…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XJV_prelude-to-gettysburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
One of the great debates of our Country's history and legacy is what scholars call "the two Civil Wars": the first a matter of campaigns, generals, and troop movements and the second focusing on the ways that the great conflict affected the daily rhythms of…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XJW_market-square-during-the-civil-war-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
By the 1860s, many railroad lines met in Harrisburg. Agricultural products, industrial raw materials, and factory-finished goods moved through Harrisburg on the way to every part of the nation. Throughout the Civil War, the Union army depended on the city a…
www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1XJX_harrisburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
Harrisburg was one of the prizes Robert E. Lee's army was after. Home to Camp Curtin, the largest Northern training camp of the war, Harrisburg's network of railroads was vital for moving troops and supplies for the Union war effort. The capital of a northe…
PAGE 4 OF 5