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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CKG_brontosaur-bulges_Morrison-CO.html
Brontosaur Bulges. The downward bulges in the rock layers are most likely dinosaur tracks viewed in cross section. When dinosaurs walked in soft sand they sank in, pushing down and distorting the layers beneath their feet. The tracks later fille…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CJS_theropod-track_Morrison-CO.html
Theropod Track. First noted by Matt Mossbrucker and later described by Dr. Martin Lockley, this theropod (a carnivorous dinosaur) track was part of the top layer of sandstone at the Bone Site, 50 yards to the north. During road construction in 1…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CJL_late-jurassic-time_Morrison-CO.html
Late Jurassic Time. This is part of the Morrison Formation accumulated around 150 million years ago. Monsoonal (seasonal) rains caused flooding which dotted the terrain with small lakes, ponds, and braided streams. These served as watering holes …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CJC_rock-deformation_Morrison-CO.html
Rock Deformation. Mountain-building processes generate massive pressures in the earth's crust. Such pressures cause the rock layers to tilt, buckle, or fold and sometimes to break or crack. In addition to the obvious tilting of rocks along the D…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CGF_bone-deposition_Morrison-CO.html
Bone Deposition. Dinosaur bones were deposited here on the inside of a meander by a fast-flowing stream. This deposit known as a "point bar" grew by the addition of sand, causing growth of the point bar towards the outer bank and downst…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CEY_the-rocky-mountains_Morrison-CO.html
The high mountains west of here are the beginning of the Rocky Mountains. They are made up of resistant Precambrian granite and gneiss. The prominent red rocks in Red Rocks Park are the Fountain Formation, a series of sandstones and conglomera…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2B8G_water-treatment-protects-downstream-users_Leadville-CO.html
By the time Charles Senter staked his claims on Bartlett Mountain in 1879, the trout were gone from Ten Mile Creek. It had been altered by smelting and mining that took place long before Climax began operations. Today, the trout are back. Nearly …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2B7C_life-on-the-high-line_Leadville-CO.html
The sound of a train whistle was music to the ears of a miner spending the winter on Fremont Pass. Up until just before World War II, Colorado 91 was a dirt track that was closed six months a year, and the railroad was the mine's only link with th…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2B7B_highway-in-the-sky_Leadville-CO.html
Colorado 91 is now a well-engineered modern highway, but driving over Fremont Pass wasn't always as safe or convenient as it is today. The silver mining boom created a population of more than 30,000 people in Leadville by 1879, making it the bigg…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2B6P_skiing-on-top-of-the-world_Leadville-CO.html
In the 1940's and 50's, Climax not only had the highest post office and standard-gauge railroad in the nation, but also one of the state's premier ski areas. The trails of the first area in Colorado to be lit for night skiing were located on the s…
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