Historical Marker Search

You searched for Postal Code: 17110

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XIW_the-ladies-of-harrisburg-during-the-civil-war-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
From virtually the first shots of the Civil War, the women of Harrisburg worked in a variety of behind-the-scenes roles that proved essential to the Union victory. When Camp Curtin opened on April 18, 1861, the ladies of Harrisburg were already at…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M48_fort-hunter-history_Harrisburg-PA.html
Prior to European settlement this land was inhabited by the Susquehannock and Delaware Indian tribes. *Around 1750 Samuel Hunter married the widow Catherine Chambers and settled here to run her gristmill. *The Fort at Hunter's Mill or Fort Hunter …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M47_slavery-at-fort-hunter_Harrisburg-PA.html
From 1786 to the early 1830s, over twenty enslaved people lived and worked at Fort Hunter. Their parents and ancestors had been stolen from Africa. The McAllister family, who created all of Fort Hunter's earliest surviving buildings, was one of th…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M3Z_pennsylvania-slavery_Harrisburg-PA.html
Slavery was entwined with Pennsylvania's earliest colonial history. Governor William Penn, founder of the colony in 1681, owned eleven enslaved people. A century later, Pennsylvania passed the 1780 Gradual Emancipation law. This allowed for the ev…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M3Y_united-states-slavery_Harrisburg-PA.html
At the birth of the United States in the 1770s, slavery was firmly embedded in its fabric. Blacks stolen from Africa were shipped to America as part of a lucrative trade system. Most enslaved people lived in the South, but about 10% lived in the N…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M0K_rockville-bridge_Harrisburg-PA.html
The longest stone masonry arch railroad bridge in the world, visible to the south, was built between 1900 and 1902. Named for the surrounding small settlement, it has forty-eight arches and a length of 3,820 feet. It is the third bridge constructe…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM831_village-of-heckton_Harrisburg-PA.html
Named for Dr. Lewis Heck - Born 1810 - Died 1890 - Reared in Shippensburg, Dr. Heck settled here in 1832. He practiced medicine and served as a Representative in the Pennsylvania General Assembly during the Civil War. He also operated a large stea…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM4CE_harrisburg_Harrisburg-PA.html
Pennsylvania's capital since 1812. As Harris' Ferry, was settled a century before by John Harris Sr. Laid out as a town in 1785 by John Harris Jr. For over 200 years a center of travel, trade and historic events.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM4CD_wildwood-park_Harrisburg-PA.html
Inspired by 'City Beautiful' advocates Horace McFarland and Mira Lloyd Dock, Wildwood Park opened its first trails in 1907. The largest of several Harrisburg parks designed in 1901 by leading horticulturist Warren Manning, it was part of a nationw…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM4C8_wildwood-lake-sanctuary_Harrisburg-PA.html
Here at the base of Blue Mountain and within the City of Harrisburg's northern tier lies the 212-acre Wildwood Lake Sanctuary, the last vestige and magnificent preserve of the Susquehanna flood-plain wetlands which at one time were common prior to…
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