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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM286I_ever-changing-landscapes_Orange-TX.html
The grounds were very important to the Starks. Much as the home changed throughout their lives, the grounds also evolved. Over the years, they added three greenhouses, or conservatories, a potting shed, lily pond, servants quarters, and more. …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM27GK_the-orange-leader_Orange-TX.html
Tracing its origins to 1875, this newspaper has served Orange for over a century. It began as "The Orange Weekly Tribune" operated by A. P. Harris, general mercantile merchant. Through subsequent owners and mergers with other newspapers, the masth…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM277W_john-harmon_Orange-TX.html
Born in 1790 in St. Martin Parish, Louisiana, John Harmon lived at Poste de Attakapas, a Spanish fortification at the present site of St. Martinville. A veteran of the state's defensive actions during the War of 1812, he wed Elizabeth Compstock Cl…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM277V_dr-william-hewson-and-dr-david-caldwell-hewson_Orange-TX.html
Two in a long line of physicians in their family, William and David Caldwell Hewson were significant figures in orange County. William was born in Philadelphia in 1801. in 1821, he married Mary Ann Bankson and they moved their family several times…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM277S_site-of-end-of-the-line-station_Orange-TX.html
The original charter for a rail line through the Orange area was granted to the Sabine and Galveston Railroad and Lumber Company in 1856. About the same time the New Orleans, Opelousas and Great Western Railroad Company was building a line west fr…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM273L_atakapan-indians-of-orange-county_Orange-TX.html
The Atakapan Indians, a tribe associated with southeastern U. S. bands, lived in this area for centuries. Studies have suggested their presence covered a large region of southeast Texas. Their name comes from the Choctaw Indians, and means "Man-Ea…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM273I_old-nibletts-bluff-c-s-a_Orange-TX.html
On high point SE, across the Sabine in Louisiana. Busiest East Texas port of entry in the Civil War. Target for enemy movements west across Louisiana repeatedly in 1862-64. Confederate defense post. Supply depot to support constant troop movements…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM273B_the-sawmill-industry-in-orange-county_Orange-TX.html
Orange County's sawmill and timber industry began with hand-operated logging operations run by pioneer settlers in the 1820s. In 1835 Robert Boothe established the area's first mechanized sawmill, and in 1841 Paine & Bendy established the first st…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2732_george-alexander-pattillo_Orange-TX.html
A veteran of the War of 1812, Georgia native George Alexander Pattillo (1796-1871) migrated to this area in the early 1830s. He served on the local Committee of Correspondence created by the Convention of 1832 and on the General Council of the pro…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM272N_hugh-ochiltree_Orange-TX.html
A native of North Carolina, Hugh Ochiltree migrated to Texas in 1840. Settling first in Nacogdoches, he studied law in the office of his cousin William Beck Ochiltree, who became a prominent Justice and Texas statesman. In 1843 he moved to San Aug…
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