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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28IR_the-midday-merry-go-round_Knoxville-TN.html
The remains of this building mark the site that once served as WNOX's studio and "radiotorium" from the late 1930s until the 1950s. The Midday Merry-Go-Round, hosted by Lowell Blanchard, was broadcast six days a week at lunch time and was the most…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28GS_the-knoxville-girl_Knoxville-TN.html
The Knoxville Girl and other adaptations of folk ballads were among the earliest popular recordings in country and bluegrass music. The Knoxville Girl was among the early national recording hits for WNOX radio stars, The Louvin Brothers. In 174…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28GM_death-of-general-william-p-sanders_Knoxville-TN.html
U.S. General William P. Sanders died in the bridal suite of this building which was the Lamar House hotel at the time of the Civil War. On the previous afternoon Sanders was mortally wounded as his cavalry fought on Kingston Road, delaying the Con…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28F3_staubs-theatre_Knoxville-TN.html
Built on this spot by Peter Staub, native of Switzerland, and opened October 1, 1872. In excellence and popularity it rivaled theatres of New Orleans and Richmond. Adolph Ochs, later publisher of New York Times, was its first chief usher.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28EZ_the-tennessee-barn-dance_Knoxville-TN.html
Known for its beauty and acoustics, Staub's Opera House was operating under the name of the Lyric Theatre when it played host in the 1940s to WNOX's legendary live weekend show, The Tennessee Barn Dance, which featured such local performances as f…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28ES_patrick-sullivans-saloon_Knoxville-TN.html
Irish immigrant Patrick Sullivan (1841-1925), came to Knoxville with his family in the 1850s to work on the new railroad. Sullivan, a Union veteran, established his first bar near this spot soon after the Civil War, and built this larger, grander …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28E3_whites-mill_Knoxville-TN.html
A small tub-mill on First Creek, nearby, for grinding corn, was the first industrial establishment in this region. It was built by Gen. James White in 1786. For this reason the infant settlement was called "White's Mill" as often as "White's Fort."
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28DD_neyland-stadium_Knoxville-TN.html
Neyland Stadium, one of the largest stadiums in North America, is named for General Robert Neyland (1892-1962). This football coach who, in his 21 seasons at U.T., led the Vols through nine undefeated seasons and brought the Vols a National Champi…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28CL_roy-acuff-hank-williams_Knoxville-TN.html
The Andrew Johnson Hotel's top floor was the original site for WNOX's live country music variety show The Midday Merry-Go-Round. An early star of the show was a little known fiddler named Roy Acuff. The rowdy fans and musicians who crowded the hot…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM28CK_archie-campbell-chet-atkins_Knoxville-TN.html
Archie Campbell Archie Campbell, a beloved comedian in the country music family, launched his career as an announcer for WNOX in 1937. After a brief stint on Chattanooga radio and service in World War II, Campbell returned to Knoxville and WNOX i…
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