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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM27T_silas-burke-house_Burke-VA.html
Here lived Lt. Col. Silas Burke (b.1796-d.1854) and his wife, Hannah Coffer. Burke, for whom Burke's Station on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad was named, served as a director of the railroad and the Fairfax Turnpike Company. An innkeeper and f…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM27K_camp-russell-a-alger_Falls-Church-VA.html
Named for Secretary of War Russell A. Alger, the camp was established in May 1898 on a 1,400-acre farm called Woodburn Manor. Some 23,000 men trained here for service in the Spanish-American War. The large military population greatly affected the …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM266_first-battle-of-manassas_Centreville-VA.html
In the afternoon of 21 July 1861, after Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's and Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard's Confederates defeated Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell's Union army, the bridge over Cub Run was jammed with retreating Federal soldiers as well as civ…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25X_confederate-defenses_Centreville-VA.html
Here while the Confederate army camped at Centreville, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston built strong fortifications in the winter of 1861-1862. In Feb. 1862, President Jefferson Davis ordered Johnston to evacuate them and move his army closer to Richmond, …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25P_campaign-of-second-manassas_Centreville-VA.html
Seven miles south is Manassas, where Jackson, on his turning movement around Pope, destroyed vast quantities of supplies, August 26-27, 1862. Hill and Ewell of Jackson's force, coming from Manassas, reached Centreville on their way to Jackson's po…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25J_second-battle-of-manassas_Centreville-VA.html
Here Pope gathered his forces, August 30-31, 1862. From this point he detached troops to check Jackson at Ox Hill while the Union army retreated to the defenses at Alexandria.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM239_ravensworth_North-Springfield-VA.html
Near here stood Ravensworth, a Fitzhugh and Lee family home. Built about 1796 by William Fitzhugh, the mansion stood on the largest single land grant in Fairfax County, the 21,966 acres acquired by Fitzhugh's great-grandfather in 1685. During the …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XW_the-orange-and-alexandria-railroad-trestle_West-Springfield-VA.html
The original bridge crossing Accotink Creek was built in 1851 as part of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. During the Civil War the wooden trestle was an attractive target for Confederate soldiers. In his 28 Dec. 1862 raid on Burke's Station, Co…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1FD_auxiliary-battery_McLean-VA.html
An extensive line of rifle trenches connected the advance works of Fort Ethan Allen and Fort Marcy and extended to the west bank of the Potomac River. Auxiliary batteries for the field guns, strategically placed, provided additional strength to af…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM16B_orange-and-alexandria-rr_West-Springfield-VA.html
The Lake Accotink access road here lies atop the original road bed of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, chartered in 1849 to link the port city of Alexandria with Gordonsville in central Virginia. After the war began in 1861, railroads became st…