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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XLZ_the-golden-gate-bridge-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
The Golden Gate Bridge is a structure of striking form and elegance. Built in 1937, it remains an indispensable link in the Bay Area's transportation network and a historical monument of civil engineering and construction. The bridge was named for…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X8U_balclutha-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
was built in Scotland for the San Francisco grain trade. From the time of her launching, in 1886, until 1890 she was employed in transporting the grain harvests of California's interior valleys to the ports of Europe. "Although the building an…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X8B_the-cathead-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
This timber to support the anchor ready for "letting go" has been a fixture on shipboard for hundreds of years. As the ship approached port, the anchor was hung from the cathead by a chain called a ring stopper. One end of this chain (distinct fro…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7U_the-half-deck-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
Life in the half deck was, perhaps, the bravest start in this mortal life ever made by human beings. The stripling of 15 or 16 years of age had to pass through the fire, had to face the elements of wind and sea in their fury had to do a man's work…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7T_the-forecastle-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
The sailors lived forward in the forecastle ( pronounced foc's'le); the captain and mates lived aft in more comfortable surroundings. Sailors found the Balclutha's cramped quarters a great improvement over those earlier, smaller ships where th…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7M_steering-the-ship-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
The helmsman, standing behind the wheel of the a sailing ship seldom looked ahead. He looked down into the compass, if ordered to steer a compass course. Or he looked alternately at compass and up at a sail (the mizzen royal) when the yard…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7K_the-main-fiferail-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
When the Balclutha towed to sea in the old days, twenty five sails were ready to set as soon as the tug let go the towrope. To handle this canvas a great deal of additional cordage was rove off - buntlines, leech-lines, clew garnets, halliard, dow…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7J_the-deckhouse-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
This structure contains the galley, the carpenter's shop, as well as quarters for apprentices and the "idlers." These men, the bosun, sailmaker, carpenter, and cook were actually among the hardest workers of the crew, beginning at six in the morni…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X7I_steam-donkey-engine-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
Donkey engines like this one were common along the waterfront from the 1880s into the 1920s. These portable steam winches were used as auxiliary power for loading and unloading cargo. The name donkey comes from there fact that the engines replac…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1X76_sanitation-at-sea-historical_San-Francisco-CA.html
The toilets for ordinary sailors were usually located in the front or "head" of the ship and consisted of a series of holes in a plank which allowed for a direct drop into the ocean. From this location came the name "head," which remains a common …
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