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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MJI_from-whales-to-bales_New-Bedford-MA.html
A one-industry whaling town before the Civil War, New Bedford became a one-industry textile town afterward. Cotton bales and coal, both bound for the city's new textile mills, began to replace oil casks on New Bedford wharves. Oil casks covered…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MJD_merrills-wharf_New-Bedford-MA.html
On the other side of the Bourne Counting House, the granite building in front of you, is Merrill's Wharf, completed in 1847. The wharf then was the longest in New Bedford port. Built by Edward Merrill for an expanding whaling fleet, this wharf out…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MI9_from-whales-to-flatfish-and-scallops_New-Bedford-MA.html
The boats you see in the harbor today are mostly commercial fishing vessels - primarily draggers and scallopers; the whaling barks of the past have long since vanished. By the 1930s, just as whaling faded and the textile industry fled to the South…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MI6_dedicated-as-a-tribute_New-Bedford-MA.html
Text on Front side of Monument: Dedicated as a Tribute to the sturdy whalemen who early won fame for New Bedford and their successors who, inheriting ideals and resourcefulness gave to the city new prominence by creating a great manufac…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MHO_preserving-whalings-legacy_New-Bedford-MA.html
In 1915, in the waning light of whaling's final decade, Emily Howland Bourne financed the construction of a museum building to honor her whaling merchant father, Jonathan Bourne, Jr. This marked the first steadfast effort to preserve New Bedford's…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MHF_a-tribute-of-respect-to-enterprising-whalemen_New-Bedford-MA.html
As a Tribute of Respect to enterprising whalemen, sons of New Bedford, who imperiled their lives, or perished, in encounters with monsters of the deep this tablet is placed here by the Children of New Bedford August 1, 1930
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GWF_the-andrew-robeson-house_New-Bedford-MA.html
Change of Address Andrew Robeson, whaling merchant and steadfast abolitionist, built this Federal-style house in 1821 on a lot on North Second Street, diagonally behind you. The estate, with its conservatory, gardens, surrounding elm trees, and wh…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GVF_captain-paul-cuffe_New-Bedford-MA.html
Captain Paul Cuffe Paul Cuffe (1759-1817) was a sea captain, merchant, philanthropist, community leader, civil rights advocate and abolitionist. Here are some significant details about his life. Westport, MA: site of the Cuffe home and farms…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GVE_making-room-johnny-cake-hill_New-Bedford-MA.html
Making Room-During the days when New Bedford dominated the whaling trade, 10,000 seamen were required to sail the fleet. Pacific islanders, New England farm boys, Cape Verdeans, Portuguese from the Azores, Wampanoag Indians, and immigrants from Eu…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GVC_captain-paul-cuffe_New-Bedford-MA.html
Paul Cuffe (1759-1817) was a sea captain, merchant, philanthropist, community leader, civil rights advocate and abolitionist. The son of an African father and Native American mother, Cuffe was born on the island of Cuttyhunk, off the coast of New …
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