Historical Marker Search

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1LO4_malden-booker-t-washington-homeplace_Charleston-WV.html
Marker Front: Malden Early salt-making industry that was centered here peaked in the 1850s. In 1755, Mary Ingles and Betty Draper made salt for their Indian captors here at "Buffalo Salt Licks." John Dickinson bought the site in 1785. Wells sunk…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1LO3_the-new-deal-in-your-community_Charleston-WV.html
Kanawha Boulevard has gone by various names throughout history. The Boulevard was known as Front Street when "Charles Town" was chartered in 1794. Through the years, it has been called First Street, Water Street and Kanawha Street prior to being r…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GG2_rev-ruffners-grave_Charleston-WV.html
In cemetery nearby is grave of Dr. Henry Ruffner, eminent theologian and writer, called father of Presbyterianism in the Kanawha region. After his ministry, he became head of Washington College, Lexington, Va. Wrote Ruffner Pamphlet.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GFI_ruffner-well_Charleston-WV.html
In 1808 David and Joseph Ruffner near here on the bank of the Kanawha completed a well into solid rock to a depth of 59 feet by a method and with drilling tools they devised, which was further developed in this valley by themselves and Billye Morr…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GEL_lewis-march_Charleston-WV.html
Near this place, the army of Gen. Andrew Lewis camped, Sept. 21, 1774, enroute from Lewisburg. From Charleston, Lewis led his men by land and water to Point Pleasant where Cornstalk Indians were defeated, Oct. 10, 1774.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GCY_the-block_Charleston-WV.html
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urba…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GCH_the-block_Charleston-WV.html
Heart of the black community, area was the center for black business, education, religion, and social life but also had Greek, Italian, Lebanese and Syrian businesses. Many local black leaders had ties to the area, which declined due to 1960s urba…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1GCE_state-capitol_Charleston-WV.html
West Virginia's Capitol is much traveled; Wheeling to Charleston to Wheeling and then back to Charleston, it moved. At this spot it stood from 1885 until destroyed by fire in 1921. The Capitol now stands two miles east.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM14FJ_presidential-presence_Charleston-WV.html
Camp White, the main Union camp at Charleston, was located directly across the Kanawha River from here. Col. Rutherford B. Hayes, 23rd Ohio Infantry, occupied the camp and Charleston in March 1863. He ordered his men to build a fort on top of the …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1467_the-necessary-ingredient_Charleston-WV.html
In the decades before the Civil War, this region, called the Kanawha Salines, had a booming salt industry. Salt extraction created vast wealth here, and by 1846, this area had led the nation with 3.2 million bushels produced. During the Civil War,…
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