The History of Redpath Memorial Presbyterian Church Historical

The History of Redpath Memorial Presbyterian Church Historical (HM1UF8)

Location: Harbor Springs, MI 49740 Emmet County
Country: United States of America

N 45° 38.579', W 85° 2.13'

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Inscription
The Cross Village Presbyterian Church was first organized on February 19, 1888, and dedicated in October of 1890. In 1918, a fire that destroyed much of the town also consumed the church. The church was rebuilt in 1921 as the results of the untiring efforts of a pioneer missionary, Reverend John Redpath. While the church was under construction, Rev. Redpath, who was eighty years old at the time, worked at any task, however menial, that was within his strength. He also canvassed all the resort areas in the county to raise funds. The summer people, who were impressed by his sincerity and zeal, responded generously. Through his persistent faith and constant endeavor, this beautiful house of worship was made possible. During his lifetime, no thought had been given to naming the church for its pastor. No doubt the idea would have been embarrassing to the unassuming man that he was. Following his death in 1926, the congregation felt that it must be so named.
During the next few years, the lumbering people moved away and the population in Cross Village dwindled. This small picturesque stone church stood empty. At one point, it was about to be purchased for a retail store. Several attempts to reopen it failed, and it became a community eyesore from neglect and vandalism.
Two young couples who summered with their families in Cross
Village felt that this beautiful church should again become a living house of worship. Jerry and Ellen Archer and David and Anne Munger asked the Presbytery for permission to reopen the church for the regular Protestant worship services during the summer, since the only other church in the vicinity was Roman Catholic. The presbytery granted permission to reopen the church, and Jerry Archer and David Munger each conducted five services in the summer of 1965. By 1967, the church had many that attended regularly and helped with the worship services when they were in the area. The season that year was lengthened to twelve Sunday services beginning with a Memorial Day service and ending Labor Day Sunday.
This small congregation has continued to grow in attendance, income and dedication. Members of the church meet on Memorial Day weekend to elect officers, divide responsibilities and complete plans for the following summer. After necessary building maintenance is done and special requests and emergency needs are cared for, a portion of the offerings are returned to the community. A number of Cross Village college students are awarded scholarships each year to further their education. We have no formal pledges and a very informal organizational structure.
The congregation is comprised of many summer residents who are active in their home churches during the winter, but take part
in the life of this church when they are vacationing in the area. Current residents of Cross Village, retired and young couples who have recently moved into the area and visitors of members also attend services. Those who pass by and are intrigued with the uniqueness of this church are welcome to worship at Redpath.
Lay people as well as occasional guest speakers conduct worship services. Following the service on Sunday, there is a coffee hour at the church or in a home or nearby cottage of one of the members. The term "church family" describes this small group of dedicated people who are endeavoring to do God's will by providing a place of worship, a source of spiritual strength, fellowship and friendship.
We ask God's continued blessing on this little church and all that worship here.
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I Saw The Marker

My wife and I were visiting Cross Village while staying at a rental cabin a few miles away.
The church and its sign brought back many memories from the days of our own courtship and, in fact, we spent our honeymoon in July of 1967 at a cabin in Good Hart, MI, some fifteen to twenty miles from Cross Village. This was a cabin in which my wife's parents often vacationed, and as I became part of the family it became a very special place and area for me as well.

I am now a retired Presbyterian Church (U.S.A) minister although I didn't go to seminary until the early 1980s. However, back in the mid-60s I was asked by a member of the Redpath summer congregation if I would fill the pulpit one Sunday when my fiance and I were staying at a cottage she owned.. I felt honored by the request, and though we have lived in several different parts of the U.S., I/we find Northern Michigan to have a special beauty.

Jun 1, 2017 at 5:39pm PDT by cdapastorbill

Details
HM NumberHM1UF8
Tags
Placed ByRedpath Memorial Presbyterian Church
Marker Condition
9 out of 10 (1 reports)
Date Added Friday, September 16th, 2016 at 9:05am PDT -07:00
Locationbig map
UTM (WGS84 Datum)16T E 653090 N 5056258
Decimal Degrees45.64298333, -85.03550000
Degrees and Decimal MinutesN 45° 38.579', W 85° 2.13'
Degrees, Minutes and Seconds45° 38' 34.74" N, 85° 2' 7.8" W
Driving DirectionsGoogle Maps
Area Code(s)231, 616
Which side of the road?Marker is on the right when traveling North
Closest Postal AddressAt or near 6258-6264 N Lake Shore Dr, Harbor Springs MI 49740, US
Alternative Maps Google Maps, MapQuest, Bing Maps, Yahoo Maps, MSR Maps, OpenCycleMap, MyTopo Maps, OpenStreetMap

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