Clay County / Clay County Courthouse

Clay County / Clay County Courthouse (HM1SJH)

Location: Ashland, AL 36251 Clay County
Country: United States of America

N 33° 16.469', W 85° 50.134'

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Inscription
Clay County
Established Dec. 7, 1866


Boundaries of eastern Talladega County and western Randolph County were redrawn in 1866 to create the 58th county of Alabama. The name honors U. S. Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky. Historical place names include Almond, Anititchapko, Ashland, Barfield, Berwick, Bluff Springs, Bowden Grove, Brownsville, Bull Gap Crossroads, Campbell Springs, Carbon, Carr Mill, Chambers Springs, Clairmont Springs, Cleveland Crossroads, Coleta, Cooley, Copper Mine, County Line, Cragford, Delta, Dempsy, East Mill, Elias, Erin, Fishhead, Flat Rock, Fox Creek, Gibsonville, Gilberts Mill. Glades, Guntertown, Harlan, Hatchet Creek, Haynes Crossroads, High Pine, Highland, Hillabee, Hillabi Town, Hollins, Idaho, Jenkins Springs, Laundshi, Lineville Lundies Crossroads, McConathy, Mellow Valley, Midway, Millerville, Motley, Mountain, Needmore, Pinckneyville, Potus-Hatchi, Puckna, Pyriton, Rays Crossroads, Roma, Roselle, Ross Ford, Shady Grove, Shinbone, Sikesville, Skegg Crossroads, Springhill, Talladega Mountains, Union, Wako-Kayi, Watts Crossroads, Watts Mill. Weathers, Wesobulga, Wheelerville,
Wicker, and Winn.

Clay County Courthouse
Built 1906


The county's first courthouse burned in 1875. Anniston architect Charles W. Carleton designed the present courthouse with Italian Renaissance elements. Contractor Harper & Barnes of Cleveland, Tenn., completed the building in August, 1906, at a cost of $37,986. A Seth Thomas clock in the dome is dated 1907. The courthouse has the highest elevation of any courthouse in Alabama. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black began his legal career here in 1906. Congressman Bob Riley launched a campaign for governor on the west side of the courthouse, and in 2003 became the first county native to serve as governor. This marker celebrating the centennial of the courthouse was unveiled on Aug. 12, 2006.
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Details
HM NumberHM1SJH
Year Placed2006
Placed ByAlabama Tourism & Travel, Lee Sentelll, Director / Courthouse Celebration Chairman Probate Judge George Ingram
Marker ConditionNo reports yet
Date Added Wednesday, June 8th, 2016 at 9:02pm PDT -07:00
Locationbig map
UTM (WGS84 Datum)16S E 608441 N 3682321
Decimal Degrees33.27448333, -85.83556667
Degrees and Decimal MinutesN 33° 16.469', W 85° 50.134'
Degrees, Minutes and Seconds33° 16' 28.14" N, 85° 50' 8.04" W
Driving DirectionsGoogle Maps
Area Code(s)256
Which side of the road?Marker is on the right when traveling South
Closest Postal AddressAt or near 2nd Ave N, Ashland AL 36251, US
Alternative Maps Google Maps, MapQuest, Bing Maps, Yahoo Maps, MSR Maps, OpenCycleMap, MyTopo Maps, OpenStreetMap

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