History of Our Maryland Flag

History of Our Maryland Flag (HM25XV)

Location: Annapolis, MD 21401 Anne Arundel County
Country: United States of America

N 38° 58.807', W 76° 29.366'

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Inscription
Design

The black and gold design on the flag is the coat of arms from the Calvert line. It was granted to George Calvert as a reward for his storming a fortification during a battle. The red and white sides of the cross alternating. Since George Calvert's mother was an heiress, he was entitled to use both coats of arms in his banner. It is one of only four U.S. state flags that does not contain the color blue (the other three being Alabama, California, and New Mexico).

History

"Crossland Banner"
Unofficial state flag of Maryland used by secessionists/Confederates during American Civil War

The Maryland colony was founded by Cecilius Calvert, second baron and Lord Baltimore, (1605-1675), which was granted to him as George's son and heir by King Charles I, hence the use of his family's coat of arms in the flag. At first, only the gold and black Calvert arms were associated with Maryland, being reintroduced in 1854. The red and white colored arms of the Crossland family, which belonged to the family of Calvert's (Lord Baltimore's) paternal grandmother, gained popularity during the American Civil War, during which Maryland remained with the Union despite a large proportion of the citizenry's support for the Confederacy, especially in the central City of Baltimore and the



counties of the southern part of the state and the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. Those Marylanders who supported the Confederacy, many of whom fought in the Army of Northern Virginia of General Robert E. Lee, adopted the Crossland banner, which was red and white with the bottony (trefoil) cross. The black and gold (yellow) colors with the chevron design of the Calvert family were used in the flags and devices and uniform pins of the Union Army regiments in the northern Army of the Potomac.

After the war, Marylanders who had fought on either side of the conflict returned to their state in need of reconciliation. The present design, which incorporates both of the coats of arms used by George Calvert, began appearing. At first, the Crossland coat of arms was put in the upper-left corner, but this was supposedly swapped with the Union's Calvert arms because of the Union victory.

The flag in its present form was first flown on October 11, 1880, in Baltimore, at a parade marking the 150th anniversary of the founding of Baltimore (1729-1730). It also was flown on October 25, 1888, at the Gettysburg Battlefield during ceremonies dedicating monuments to the Maryland regiments of the Army of the Potomac by reorganization regiments of the former state militia, now the Maryland National Guard. However, it was not officially adopted as the state flag until 1904.

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2001, a survey conducted by the North American Vexillological Association (NAVA) placed Maryland's flag fourth best in design quality out of the 72 Canadian provincial, U.S. state and U.S. territory flags ranked.

Flagpole Restrictions

Maryland is the only state in the union that has a specific guideline not only how to display the flag but on what the flagpole should look like as well. In 1945, the Maryland General Assembly made a gold cross bottony the official ornament for the top of any flagpole carrying the state flag. Some time before October 10, 2007, Government House (the governor's mansion) in Annapolis ceased to display the cross bottony at the top of the flag pole, but the flags at the State House continue to do so (adhering to Maryland Code Section 13-202 and 203). All other state government buildings, including public schools, obey this guideline, but many private individuals and businesses do not.
Details
HM NumberHM25XV
Tags
Marker ConditionNo reports yet
Date Added Monday, March 12th, 2018 at 10:02am PDT -07:00
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Locationbig map
UTM (WGS84 Datum)18S E 370988 N 4315625
Decimal Degrees38.98011667, -76.48943333
Degrees and Decimal MinutesN 38° 58.807', W 76° 29.366'
Degrees, Minutes and Seconds38° 58' 48.42" N, 76° 29' 21.96" W
Driving DirectionsGoogle Maps
Area Code(s)410, 301, 443, 202, 703
Which side of the road?Marker is on the right when traveling North
Closest Postal AddressAt or near 45 Maryland Ave, Annapolis MD 21401, US
Alternative Maps Google Maps, MapQuest, Bing Maps, Yahoo Maps, MSR Maps, OpenCycleMap, MyTopo Maps, OpenStreetMap

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