The ?Mayor' of Silver Spring

The ?Mayor' of Silver Spring (HM137X)

Location: Silver Spring, MD 20910 Upper Franconia
Country: United States of America

N 38° 59.535', W 77° 1.58'

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Inscription
"Don't Worry About It"
The ?Mayor' of Silver Spring.
Norman Lane 1911-1987.

Remembering the Loving Kindhearted Forbearance of the People of Silver Spring

The "Mayor of Silver Spring" was our official town drunk. Although he was born into a prominent DC family, Norman go off to a rough start. His mother had TB and the stress of bringing him to term took her life and left little Norman with life-long problems. He ran away from a school for retarded children when he was six. He grew up as an outcast, drifting around the country doing odd jobs, farm work and washing dishes. He was an odd shaped piece that never quite fit into society's jigsaw puzzle.

Norman's was the picture of misery. Often wearing his shoes on the wrong feet, his rumpled clothes hung off his 90 pound frame like a scarecrow. He looked like a gargoyle peering out from under a hard hat. After returning to the DC area, he spent the winter of 1966 in Glenmont, sleeping in the fire department coal bin. That spring he wandered down Georgia Avenue.

In Silver Spring he found a home. The Phillips family set up a cot for him in the back of their auto body shop. For 25 years Norman lived in that back alley garage, which was directly behind this statue. It was the only real home he ever knew. After his death, Norman's alley, "Mayor Lane" was named for him. Silver Spring's business community, the shoppers, the police and the fire departments were his family. They accepted his drinking, his coarse manners and came to love his quirky Tom Sawyer sense of humor.

"Don' worry ?bout it" was Norman's answer to everything. As our "Mayor" made is rounds he generously shared a bit of his permanent vacation with us work-a-day shut-ins. He owned nothing. He shambled through these streets happily living out our worst fears for us. After seeing Norman, we really didn't worry about it quite so much. Fridays were his big day. He retrieved armloads of flowers from the flower shops' trash and passed out bouquets to the ladies (Norman loved the ladies). His weathered, toothless face looked like a rusty ax stuck in the midst of those brightly-colored flowers.

One day he put out his last cigarette in his last beer and just like that he quit. But the truth is he wasn't much different sober. Silver Spring's loving care allowed Norman to live out his life on his own terms. Silver Spring's finest hour lasted 25 years.

This monument was sculpted and donated by Fred Folsom in 1991

Details
HM NumberHM137X
Tags
Year Placed1991
Marker ConditionNo reports yet
Date Added Monday, September 1st, 2014 at 8:11am PDT -07:00
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Locationbig map
UTM (WGS84 Datum)18S E 324509 N 4317869
Decimal Degrees38.99225000, -77.02633333
Degrees and Decimal MinutesN 38° 59.535', W 77° 1.58'
Degrees, Minutes and Seconds38° 59' 32.10" N, 77° 1' 34.80" W
Driving DirectionsGoogle Maps
Area Code(s)240, 301, 202
Closest Postal AddressAt or near 8217 Georgia Ave, Silver Spring MD 20910, US
Alternative Maps Google Maps, MapQuest, Bing Maps, Yahoo Maps, MSR Maps, OpenCycleMap, MyTopo Maps, OpenStreetMap

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