Historical Marker Search

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1WC9_fort-dickerson-historical_Knoxville-TN.html
On November 4, 1863, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet led two reinforced divisions from Chattanooga to attack Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's garrison at Knoxville. Burnside confronted Longstreet below Knoxville, then withdrew on November 12. Lo…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1L2I_fort-dickerson_Knoxville-TN.html
Linking with other hills south of the river, this Union position was a major factor in the defense of Knoxville. Occupied on Nov.1, 1863, by the 2nd Brig. (Col. Daniel Cameron), 3rd Div. XXIII corps, its gunfire broke up an attempt on Nov. 15-16 b…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM16GQ_john-sevier-farmstead_Knoxville-TN.html
Marble Springs was the farmstead of John Sevier. Tennessee's first governor (1796-1801 and 1803-1809). While Sevier used the farm as a retreat where he entertained guests, it was originally a frontier station used by immigrants on the trace from t…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM16GP_forts-dickerson-and-stanley_Knoxville-TN.html
Fort Dickerson to the west and Fort Stanley to the east were the center two of four fortified heights held by the Federals south of the river during the siege of Knoxville, Nov. 17-Dec. 4, 1863. Maj. Gen. Jos. Wheeler C.S.A., made a vain effort to…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM16GO_fort-dickerson_Knoxville-TN.html
This Federal work was a major factor in the defense of Knoxville against Lt. Gen. Longstreet's assault in November, 1863. The fort and neighboring hills were manned by the 2nd Brigade(Cameron), 3rd Div., XXIII Corps, which repulsed by fire Wheeler…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2AP_fort-dickerson_Knoxville-TN.html
-1863- · One of sixteen Union Army earthen forts and battery positions protecting Knoxville, Nov. 1863-May 1865. · Named for Capt. Jonathan C. Dickerson, 112th Illinois Mounted Infantry who was killed near Cleveland, TN on Sept…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2AO_the-1863-siege-of-knoxville_Knoxville-TN.html
Introduction. After defeating the Union Army of the Cumberland in the bloody battle of Chickamauga (Sep 18-20, 1863) and besieging the Federal provisions in the city of Chattanooga, Confederate Army of Tennessee Commander Gen. Braxton Bragg turned…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2AN_civil-war-knoxville_Knoxville-TN.html
What Brought the Armies of the Blue and the Gray to Knoxville? Knoxville was a pro-Confederate town of some 3700 persons when Tennessee seceded from the Union in June of 1861. It was the commercial and light manufacturing center of East Tenness…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2AM_back-door-to-knoxville_Knoxville-TN.html
Fort Dickerson came under attack only once during the Civil War. in a prelude to the 1863 Siege of Knoxville, Federal and Confederate cavalry fought for possession of these heights. Its lofty presence, however, served as a deterrent until the end …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2AL_fort-dickerson-1863-64_Knoxville-TN.html
Fort Dickerson was one of the sixteen Federal forts and battery emplacements constructed around Knoxville during the Civil War. Temporary earthworks were thrown up here in November 1863. Designed by Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Chief Engineer of the Army…
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