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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MGY_fort-hill_Dalton-GA.html
The Confederate "Army of Tennessee" that defended Dalton from November 1863 to May 1864 briefly returned here the following October. It was much depleted in both size and spirit. Their unsuccessful defense of Atlanta ended with its fall on Septemb…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MEG_western-and-atlantic-railroad-depot_Dalton-GA.html
Date of Construction: 1852 Builder: Western and Atlantic Railroad Original Occupancy: Railroad Station Here, during the Civil War on April 12, 1862, the engine "Texas," dropped off a telegraph operator with orders to warn the Confederate Army…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MEF_rocky-face-ridge-phase_Dalton-GA.html
Confederates withdraw to Resaca when Federal flank movement threatens their rear. (labels) Confederate position Rocky Face Ridge Federal attack fails / Mill Creek Gap Federal flank movement / Dug Gap
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1MEE_the-battle-of-mill-creek-gap_Dalton-GA.html
The Atlanta Campaign opened at 3:00 AM on the morning of May 7th as the bugles of McCook's Federal Brigade sounded reveille at their camps near Ringgold. Federal troops occupied the village of Tunnel Hill and approached Buzzard's Roost Pass, as Mi…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M30_crow-valley_Dalton-GA.html
The opening actions of the Atlanta Campaign occurred around Dalton during early May 1864. Union Major General William T. Sherman's strategy, as two of his three armies approached from the north and northwest, involved a series of demonstrations by…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMXV2_dug-gap_Dalton-GA.html
Dug Gap was so named because a pioneer road, cut out of the hillside, passed through a cleft in Rocky Face Ridge at this point. The road led east to Dalton and the Western and Atlantic Railroad, important military objectives. Federals sought in…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMU43_the-huff-house_Dalton-GA.html
General Joseph E. Johnston commanding Confederate army occupied this house as headquarters from December 1863 to March 1864
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMU26_the-blunt-house_Dalton-GA.html
This house, built in 1848 by Ainsworth Emery Blunt, pioneer settler of Dalton, has been continuously occupied by members of his family. Appointed postmaster of Cross Plains in 1845, Mr. Blunt was elected mayor when that town became Dalton in 1847 …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMU06_historic-varnell-home_Dalton-GA.html
This historic home was built in 1847 by "Dry Dan Dold" for M. P. Varnell, a pioneer settler of this community. In the War Between the States, this home was used as a temporary hospital by Federals and Confederates. Several skirmishes and engagemen…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMU02_old-federal-road_Dalton-GA.html
The highway crossing east and west at this point is the Old Federal Road, northwest Georgia's earliest vehicular route. It led across the Indian County from the southeast boundary of the Cherokees, in the direction of Athens, toward Nashville via …
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