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You searched for City|State: harrisburg, pa

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XJX_harrisburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
Harrisburg was one of the prizes Robert E. Lee's army was after. Home to Camp Curtin, the largest Northern training camp of the war, Harrisburg's network of railroads was vital for moving troops and supplies for the Union war effort. The capital o…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XJW_market-square-during-the-civil-war-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
By the 1860s, many railroad lines met in Harrisburg. Agricultural products, industrial raw materials, and factory-finished goods moved through Harrisburg on the way to every part of the nation. Throughout the Civil War, the Union army depended on …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XJV_prelude-to-gettysburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
One of the great debates of our Country's history and legacy is what scholars call "the two Civil Wars": the first a matter of campaigns, generals, and troop movements and the second focusing on the ways that the great conflict affected the daily …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XJT_threatened-invasion-of-harrisburg-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
General Robert E. Lee decided to take the war into the North in June 1863, allowing Southern farmers an uninterrupted growing season, and perhaps convincing European powers to aid the Confederacy. As the rebels invaded Pennsylvania, Harrisburg mad…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XJ0_thomas-morris-chester-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
Thomas Morris Chester was born at the corner of Third and Market Streets in Harrisburg in 1834. One of Harrisburg's most famous nineteenth century African-Americans, he was particularly known for his leadership in education, journalism, military r…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XIW_the-ladies-of-harrisburg-during-the-civil-war-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
From virtually the first shots of the Civil War, the women of Harrisburg worked in a variety of behind-the-scenes roles that proved essential to the Union victory. When Camp Curtin opened on April 18, 1861, the ladies of Harrisburg were already at…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1XHW_old-philadelphia-reading-railroad-station-historical_Harrisburg-PA.html
On the site of the present Market Street Post Office Building stood until the early 1960's the old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station, Harrisburg's second passenger terminal that exemplified the City's prominence and traditional role as trans…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M49_leaders-stewards-and-advocates_Harrisburg-PA.html
By 1873, Bethel AME Church served three elements of the city's Black population; those free before the Civil War, those emancipated and placed in Bethel's care by the Freedman's Bureau; and immigrants fleeing the South's Jim Crow laws. To shelter…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M48_fort-hunter-history_Harrisburg-PA.html
Prior to European settlement this land was inhabited by the Susquehannock and Delaware Indian tribes. *Around 1750 Samuel Hunter married the widow Catherine Chambers and settled here to run her gristmill. *The Fort at Hunter's Mill or Fort Hunter …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M47_slavery-at-fort-hunter_Harrisburg-PA.html
From 1786 to the early 1830s, over twenty enslaved people lived and worked at Fort Hunter. Their parents and ancestors had been stolen from Africa. The McAllister family, who created all of Fort Hunter's earliest surviving buildings, was one of th…
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